Artist/Composer:Gábor Gadó Quartet - Dave Liebman
 Title:Ungrund
(P) 2013
élu - Citizen Jazz
"Ungrund", whose title draws on the theologian Jakob Boehme's concept of "unground" (bottomless nothing), whence light springs forth, is a paradoxical parenthesis in the musical career of Gábor Gadó. The album occurs at a time when he has put himself in a state of watchfulness through immersing himself in the works of Johan-Sebastian Bach and the pianist-composer Barnabás Dukay...


01. Friends Play
9:49
02. Pavane pour une infante défunte
10:22
03. Spirale
10:49
04. Sanctus
8:53
05. Weltraum
8:18
06. Eternal Recurrence
14:34
07. D. P.
6:24

 Total time: 69:13
Performers
Gábor Gadó - guitar
Dave Liebman - tenor and soprano saxophones
Matthieu Donarier - tenor saxophone
Sébastien Boisseau - double bass
Joe Quitzke - drums
Production notes:
All compositions by Gábor Gadó except track 2 by Ravel
Recorded live by Adrian Patrascanu at the Festival Theatre of the Palace of Arts (MÜPA), Budapest, 14 January, 2011
Mixed and mastered by László Válik at L.V. Hang Studio
Design-content by GABMER > www.bachman.hu

Producer: Gőz László
Label manager: Bognár Tamás

In cooperation with MÜPA - The Palace of Arts, Budapest
The recording was supported by the National Cultural Fund of Hungary and the Artisjus Music Foundation

Ken Dryden - The New York City Jazz Records (en)
Scott Yanow - Los Angeles Jazz Scenes (en)
Eric Quenot - Jazz Magazine / Jazzman (fr)
Franpi Barriaux - Citizen Jazz (fr)
Mathias Bäumel - Dresdner Universitätsjournal (ger)
Jazzthing (ger)
Neri Pollastri - All About Jazz (ita)
Z.K. Slabý - HIS Voice (cz)
Patrick Španko - skjazz.sk (sl)
Ördögh Krisztián - Jazzma.hu (hu)
Bércesi Barbara - Gramofon (hu)
Zipernovszky Kornél - Fidelio (hu)
Komlós József jr. - Kecskeméti Lapok (hu)
Sinkovics Ferenc - Magyar Hírlap (hu)

Click on the image for higher resolution!"Ungrund", whose title draws on the theologian Jakob Boehme's concept of "unground" (bottomless nothing), whence light springs forth, is a paradoxical parenthesis in the musical career of Gábor Gadó. The album occurs at a time when he has put himself in a state of watchfulness through immersing himself in the works of Johan-Sebastian Bach and the pianist-composer Barnabás Dukay. It took as long to record as the concert during which he rediscovered, as when going back home, his French quartet who enabled his music of a few years ago to blossom so well. But at the request of the organizers, he also welcomed the Outsider, according to a custom which owes something to the tradition of the jam session, the rite of patronage and the necessities of communication. Now, to want to penetrate the universe of Gábor Gadó impromptu is to risk losing oneself in his labyrinthine compositions and deceptive harmonic language. This suggestion immediately made Gábor think of Dave Liebman: "In his music I hear something that makes him close to the quartet. He is not only a very great jazzman. The tone and the phrasing of his saxophone remind me of the Book of Job, a way of interacting and debating with the forces beyond us."

But if Dave Liebman has the spirit of a crusader, always journeying towards new musical confrontations and conquests, he is also capable of wisdom. Having no more than one afternoon for rehearsal, he requested that the choice of repertoire should encourage the most spontaneous playing. This is why the disc begins with Friends Play, a piece conceived for the intensity of the improvized playing at the end of the sessions of "Unknown Kingdom" and which the guest here takes to fever pitch. This is why "Ungrund" is the quartet's jazziest album and gives listeners a chance to discover a little-known aspect of the drummer Joe Quitzke. And that is why Dave Liebman remained distant from the Sanctus, a musical quatrain after a poem by János Pilinszky where the presence of a last-minute guest would have been intrusive. And yet, struck through as it is by the incandescent gladius sword of Dave Liebman, the parenthesis formed by "Ungrund" is also a veritable milestone in that it makes audible the first fruits of this time of watchfulness, from which it originates. It seems that the one-day guest took the bait, along with his hosts, and tasted with them the intoxicating flavours.

Franck Bergerot, editor of Jazz Magazine
Translated by Richard Robinson