Artist/Composer:Marguet / Kühn / Monniot / Boisseau
 Title:Émotions Homogènes
(P) 2009
élu - Citizen Jazz Jazz Magazine - CHOC
The implication, the listening, the understanding and the passion that unite the four members of this group is not only exemplary; it is the very definition of the kind of jazz you’d like to champion. A sincere, flourishing, adventurous jazz, far from all manner or calculation, opportunism and pigeonholing. A jazz that is contemporary and European, free and audacious, one the whole world envies us for. We can only wish that it continue to live and gain followers. The battle is not easy, but it must at all costs be won and Christophe Marguet knows better than anyone: we must both persist in the fight, and hold on to the spirit of poetry.

Lionel Eskenazi
Notes musicales


01. Sata
(Joachim Kühn)
8:19
02. Have you met mystic?
(Christophe Monniot)
10:04
03. Wanbli
(Sébastien Boisseau)
5:15
04. White widow introduction
(Joachim Kühn)
2:03
05. White widow
(Joachim Kühn)
11:38
06. Ballet
(Christophe Marguet)
4:08
07. Dahin
(Joachim Kühn)
5:26
08. Song for Bacon
(Christophe Marguet)
10:31
09. Leo
(Joachim Kühn)
5:55

 Total time: 63:25
Performers
Christophe Monniot - alto and baritone saxophone
Joachim Kühn - piano
Sébastien Boisseau - double bass
Christophe Marguet - drums

Production notes:
Recorded and mixed by Gerard De Haro and Nicolas Baillard at Studio La Buissonne in Pernes les Fontaines, France, 2-3 and 20-21 May, 2009
Mastered by Nicolas Baillard
Joachim Kühn appears by courtesy of ACT Music + Vision, Germany; his compositions published by E. Pleasure Point Music – EMI Music Publishing, Germany
Photo: Gerard De Haro
Artwork & design: www.bachman.hu

Produced by László Gõz
Label manager: Tamás Bognár

Supported by Musique Française d’Aujourd’hui, Goethe-Institut Budapest and Institut Français de Budapest

Thierry Quénum - Jazzman / Jazz magazine (fr)
Franpi Barriaux - Citizen Jazz (fr)
Reiner Kobe - Jazzpodium (ger)
Rudi Duarte - Jazz.pt (por)
Végsõ Zoltán - Élet és Irodalom (hu)
Malina János - Revizor (hu)
Rockinform (hu)
Sinkovics Ferenc - Magyar Hírlap (hu)
Czékus Mihály - Napvilág.net (hu)
Komlós József Jr. - Kecskenet.hu (hu)

Click on the image for higher resolution!Listening and understanding

“Listening and understanding”, what a fine slogan, one that could be seized upon by the politicians that set such store by the building of Europe. Artists, particularly jazz musicians, have not waited for the European constitution to listen to and understand each other, in the exacting practice of their art, which consists of “playing” (in every sense of the word), composing, arranging, improvising, interacting and expressing oneself freely in order to develop a definite point of view and a unique universe.

The Marguet, Kühn, Monniot, Boisseau Quartet (MKMB) is the perfect example: an example of a European understanding (with three French musicians, one German, and a Hungarian label), of intergene-rational understanding with the “papa” Joachim Kühn and three partners young enough to be his sons, and an example of musical understanding based on the cohabitation of Afro-American jazz branded with freedom, like that of Ornette Coleman, and notated European music going from J.S. Bach through Messiaen, to the Viennese twelve-tone composers and Bartók.


MKMBThe pianist Joachim Kühn, born in 1944 in Eastern Germany, represents all these types of music, since he appreciates rock and pop as well as the music of Black Africa and the Maghreb. This paternal figure surrounded by his musical “sons” is very well known in France with Daniel Humair’s group Baby Boom, a group whose saxophonist (Christophe Monniot) and bassist (Sébastien Boisseau) also appear here. This paternal figure also appears in Henri Texier’s Strada Sextet, which featured the drummer Christophe Marguet. Henri Texier, Daniel Humair, Joachim Kühn: one single generation of European musicians, exacting and innovative.

And then there was the magic trio made up of Joachim Kühn, Jean-François Jenny-Clark and Daniel Humair, who is in some way the point of reference and the catalyst for the MKMB quartet. The sorely-missed bassist Jean-François Jenny-Clark played a key role for this young generation of French jazzmen. He was an exemplary, passionate teacher at the Conservatoire de Paris, and a close friend of Christophe Monniot and Sébastien Boisseau. We should clarify that on the last and masterly disc of the Kühn, Humair and Jenny-Clark trio of 1998, cleverly called Triple Entente, the opening piece bore the significant title Ornette (Joachim Kühn and Ornette Coleman had just released their duo album Colors).

It is important to unravel this thread of interconnections, because the disc you hold is called Émotions Homogènes, the French translation of a brand new Ornette Coleman composition, which the MKMB quartet regularly play at gigs. These “homogenous emotions” sum up perfectly the state of mind of the quartet, where the level of collective technique demanded is always at the service of the energy, the inspiration and the pleasure shared.

Joachim Kühn composed four of the eight pieces on this disc; even though he is not strictly speaking the leader of the formation, he is at any rate the most prolific composer. Notably, we again hear his superb White Widow, discovered in 2005 in a trio version on the album Poison, dedicated to drugs and addictions (might this White Widow be linked to artificial paradises?). This quartet version of White Widow, placed in the middle of the disc, launches with a piano solo intro of orchestral breadth where a dizzying avalanche of staccato notes fills the sounding space, then gradually calms to make way for the theme, a veritable infernal chase at rapid tempo, that allows each band member to play cat-and-mouse, whirling and pirouetting at the staggering chorus of the alto sax, piano and drumkit.

Sata, the first track, is a new composition by Kühn, that takes us on a camel-back journey through the Moroccan desert for a haunting, insistent ballad, led by the dry and implacable sonority of Marguet’s drumkit. Let’s not forget to mention the charming melody Dahin, composed for the project Kalimba with Majid Bekkas and Ramon Lopez, and suggestive of a sensual choreography.

The name of the quartet (formed by the members’ initials) clearly shows that all four are involved to an equal degree, yet it is through the drive and will of Christophe Marguet that the group came into being and gave its first concert in September 2004. He has offered to the group, from the very beginning of the project, two of his compositions, inspired by painting: Ballet (after Nicolas de Staël) and Song for Bacon, which shows off the fieriness of Christophe Monniot particularly well. Marguet is a delicate and sensitive composer-colourist who rather than foregrounding his drumming, uses it in a subtle, discreet manner. Monniot revisits his Have You Met Mystic? which he wrote for La Campagnie des musiques à ouïr, with the presence of Hungarian guitarist Gábor Gadó on the album La Manivelle Magyare (released through BMC) swelled to a sextet. The version presented here, where Monniot shifts from the alto to baritone, is quite different and allows Kühn to dash off one of his most astonishing solos. As for Sébastien Boisseau, he gives a very free rendering of the beautiful, sensitive melody Wanbli, written for the first album by Daniel Humair’s Baby Boom.

The implication, the listening, the understanding and the passion that unite the four members of this group is not only exemplary; it is the very definition of the kind of jazz you’d like to champion. A sincere, flourishing, adventurous jazz, far from all manner or calculation, opportunism and pigeonholing. A jazz that is contemporary and European, free and audacious, one the whole world envies us for. We can only wish that it continue to live and gain followers. The battle is not easy, but it must at all costs be won and Christophe Marguet knows better than anyone: we must both persist in the fight, and hold on to the spirit of poetry.

Lionel Eskenazi
translated by Richard Robinson


Thanks to Genevieve Peyregne, Eric Watson, Philippe Ochem, Gérad de Haro, Nicolas Baillard, Jean-Paul Ricard, Guillaume Orti, Isabelle Marguet, Fany Thyus, Wanbliprod, Lionel Eskenazi, Claudine Pellerin and MFA

Christophe Monniot plays Selmer saxophones and Vandoren reeds


Booking: www.wanbliprod.com


www.christophemarguet.net

www.joachimkuehn.com

www.myspace.com/moniomania

www.sebastienboisseau.com