Artist/Composer:Mihály Dresch Quartet
 Title:Árgyélus
(P) 2007
I have the feeling that people today are missing a kind of organic musical culture based on a clear overview of a system, typical for example of traditional Indian music or the Transylvanian music of our ancestors. Yet it would seem that at present we are unable to create a new musical system at this level, so we try, piecemeal fashion, to tack together the systems we consider important. The result of this ‘piecing together’ is inevitably a fragmentary culture.

Mihály Dresch
Notes musicales


01. Fragment
9:39
02. Soldier’s farewell from Szék village
3:42
03. Heritage
10:28
04. Homeward bound
8:05
05. Árgyélus
7:15
06. Tziganesque (for Archie)
8:55
07. In a sentimental mood
5:33

 Total time: 53:40
Performers
Mihály Dresch - tenor and soprano saxophones, recorder, vocals
Miklós Lukács - cimbalom
Mátyás Szandai - double bass
István Baló - drums

Ferenc Kovács - violin (3, 5, 6)
Production notes:
All compositions by Mihály Dresch, except track 2 folk song arranged by Mihály Dresch; tracks 5 and 6 by Mihály Dresch using themes from folk songs; track 7 by Duke Ellington arranged by Mihály Dresch, Miklós Lukács and Mátyás Szandai
Recorded and mixed by Attila Kölcsényi at Tom-Tom Studio, Budapest 25-28/09/ 2006
Portrait photos: István Huszti
Cover art and Art-Smart by GABMER / www.bachman.hu


Produced by László Gőz
Executive producer: Tamás Bognár


The recording was sponsored by the National Cultural Fund of Hungary and the Artisjus Music Foundation

Ken Waxman - Jazzword (en)
Stéphan Ollivier - Jazzman (fr)
Christian Bakonyi - Jazzzeit (ger)
Martin Schuster - Concerto (ger)
Stephan Richter - Fono Forum (ger)
Paolo Peviani - All About Jazz - Italia (ita)
Gonçalo Falcão - Jazz.pt (pdf) (por)
Michal Baláž - skjazz.sk (sl)
Csont András - Revizor (hu)
Turi Gábor - Gramofon (hu)
Olasz Sándor - Rockinform (hu)
Márton Attila - Demokrata (hu)
Galamb Zoltán - Ekultura.hu (hu)
Czékus Mihály – Szabó Ildikó - Papiruszportál (hu)
Sinkovics Ferenc - Demokrata (pdf) (hu)
Deák Endre - Igenhir.hu (hu)

Click on the image for higher resolution!I have the feeling that people today are missing a kind of organic musical culture based on a clear overview of a system, typical for example of traditional Indian music or the Transylvanian music of our ancestors. Yet it would seem that at present we are unable to create a new musical system at this level, so we try, piecemeal fashion, to tack together the systems we consider important. The result of this ‘piecing together’ is inevitably a fragmentary culture.

Fragment – Part of one of my old compositions, released on the LP Gondolatok a régiekről in 1988, originally entitled Fragmentary Legend. I felt it was worth reworking it, making it a little more playful.

Soldiers’ farewell from Szék village – I first heard this song in composer László Lajtha’s collection from Szék on a release in the Pátria series. It was sung by György Szabó Varga Snr., whose son I later got to know personally, and who like his father was a marvellous singer.
Later I heard it again in György Szabados’ work Katonazene, and it made a deep impression on me. This song is important to me because we are all ‘soldiers of life’.

Heritage – This shows the influence of pentatonic music, twentieth-century Hungarian music and jazz.

Dresch Mihály QuartetHomeward bound – One of my childhood experiences, when every evening a young man passed in front of our house on his merry way home.
It forms a unit with the previous two pieces, and is in fact the closing part of a united composition.

Árgyélus – This is based on a Hungarian folk song which to me represents man’s frailty. (In folk tales and songs the árgyélus is a pure, angelic figure, who normally appears in the form of a prince or a bird.)

Tziganesque (for Archie) – A folk song from southern Hungary. The mood somehow reminded me of Archie Shepp. I am happy to have met him personally and to have played with him.

In a sentimental mood – Duke Ellington’s masterpiece is, I believe, our universal heritage. It’s a song with great strength: no matter how often I play it, it ‘speaks’ immediately.


Mihály Dresch
Translated by Richard Robinson